Lawsuit Alleges Tenderloin Single Room Occupancy Hotel Rooms Rented Through AirBnB

Short-term rental service Airbnb has been targeted in a class-action lawsuit filed last week in San Francisco Superior Court stemming from allegations of illegal short-term stays at a 62-room singe-room occupancy hotel about three blocks from Union Square. The lawsuit adds fodder to the ongoing debate in San Francisco over whether to legalize short-term rentals through online services like Airbnb and how best to regulate them. The debate comes at a time when rents and evictions have hit noticeably high levels and housing is in scarce supply. Filed by attorneys Mark Hooshmand and Tyson Redenbarger of San Francisco-based Hooshmand Law Group, the lawsuit argues that Airbnb has knowingly profited from use of its services in violation of San Francisco housing codes and seeks damages for the alleged violations. Read full...

AirBnB Class Action Filed in San Francisco, California

On September 3, 2014, the Hooshmand Law Group filed a class action lawsuit against AirBnB, Inc. The lawsuit is based on the allegation that AirBnB illegally participates in and facilitates the rental of apartments in San Francisco in violation of local and state law. Filed in San Francisco Superior Court, the lawsuit also alleges that the short-term rental of apartments by AirBnB violates several San Francisco ordinances that prohibit the short-term rental of residential housing. The complaint states that AirBnB is encouraging, participating in, and profiting from prohibited activity while it is aware that such rentals in San Francisco are prohibited. According to the suit, AirBnB is partnering with hosts despite being on notice that its business model violates laws that were enacted to protect San Francisco tenancies. The named Plaintiffs in the case are residents of an apartment building in San Francisco. These residents along with the class members have been severely affected by the conversion of the building from long term housing to short-term rentals. Furthermore, the Plaintiffs allege that AirBnB has knowingly contributed to the housing shortage. The complaint provides that AirBnB is liable to any tenant who lives in a residential unit where other units in the building have been rented through AirBnB. This lawsuit includes rentals and class members in apartment buildings throughout San Francisco. It is estimated that there are more than 5,000 AirBnB rentals in San Francisco alone. To receive more information contact Mark Hooshmand, Tyson Redenbarger and Ana Lupascu of the Hooshmand Law Group at (415)...

Unscrupulous Landlord No Match for LRIS Panel Attorney Mark Hooshmand

In November 2010 the Lawyer Referral and Information Service (LRIS) was contacted by a client with a landlord-tenant issue. For three years the client was verbally harassed by the landlord and threatened with eviction without cause. Additionally the landlord failed at various times to provide heat, perform repairs, and he allowed contractors to enter the client’s apartment without prior notice. Despite numerous complaints to the landlord regarding harassment by the non-licensed property managers, the landlord failed to respond in an appropriate manner and violated numerous local and state ordinances. Referred by the San Francisco Rent Board, the client contacted the Lawyer Referral and Information Service and was subsequently referred to panel attorney Mark Hooshmand. Read full...

Eviction Protections Rile Up Tenants and Landlords

“The public comment bell rang throughout Monday’s Land Use Committee meeting as tenant rights advocates and property owners stated their case for or against expanding just cause protection laws to housing units built after 1979. In his raspy voice, Supervisor John Avalos outlined his reasons for bringing the new measure to the table: the economic crisis and increased foreclosures, and the discrepancy in just cause eviction protections between tenants who live in pre-1979 buildings and those who live in post-1979 buildings.” Click here to read more. Published in MissionLocal magazine, Novebmer 3, 2009....

HLG mentioned in Trade Secrets Blog – September 2008

Verdict in the matter of Radiant Skincare vs. Linda Moore, mentioned at the Trade Secrets Blog Superior Court, San Mateo County, California: Radiant Skincare Clinic v. Linda Moore and Rejuvenate Inc. Radiant Skincare sought damages for lost profits and unjust enrichment, as well as punitive damages. In 2002, plaintiff Radiant Skincare Clinic began providing non-surgical aesthetic services. In 2004, Linda Moore, one of the founding partners, left to start a competing business, Rejuvenate Inc. Radiant Skincare claimed that Moore used its customer list to seek clients for her new business. Radiant Skincare sued Moore and Rejuvenate for breach of contract and misappropriation of trade secrets. Plaintiff’s counsel contended that Moore solicited customers from Radiant Skincare’s customer list in violation of a written agreement and the Uniform Trade Secrets Act. Moore contended that she had a right to contact the customers on the list because she had treated them personally. She also contended that she did not solicit them, but merely told them about her new...